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A train ride from Chester to Holyhead along the North Wales Coast via Rhyl Colwyn Bay Llandudno Junction and Bangor

A wonderful journey along the North Wales Coast with industry, seaside resorts, mountains, and even a castle

Operaters Arriva Trains Wales and Virgin Trains
Journey time 1 hour 35 up to 2 hours depending on the train you use
Timetable download pdf format

train times Stations included within this timetable Gorsafoedd a ddangosir yn yr amserlen hon
Abergavenny Y Fenni Abergele & Pensarn Bangor Betws-y-Coed Bidston Birmingham International Birmingham New Street Blaenau Ffestiniog Bodorgan Buckley/Bwcle Caergwrle Cardiff Central Caerdydd Canolog Cefn-y-Bedd Chester Caer Chirk Y Waun Church Stretton Colwyn Bay  Bae Colwyn Conwy Craven Arms Crewe Cwmbran Deganwy Dolgarrog Dolwyddelan Earlestown Flint Y Fflint Frodsham Glan Conwy Gobowen Gwersyllt Hawarden Penarlag Hawarden Bridge Pont Penarlag Helsby Hereford Henffordd Heswall Holyhead Caergybi Hope Yr Hôb Leominster Liverpool Central Liverpool Lime Street Llandudno Llandudno Junction Cyffordd Llanudno Llanfairfechan Llanfairpwll Llanrwst London Euston Ludlow Llwydlo Manchester Airport Manchester Oxford Road
2
Manchester Piccadilly Neston Newport Casnewydd Newton le Willows North Llanrwst Gogledd Llanrwst Penmaenmawr Penyffordd Pont-y-Pant Pontypool & New Inn/Pontyp?l Prestatyn Rhosneigr Rhyl Roman Bridge Pont Rhufeinig Ruabon Rhiwabon Runcorn East Shotton Shrewsbury Amwythig Tal-y-Cafn T? Croes Upton Valley Y Fali Warrington Bank Quay Wrexham Central Wrecsam Canolog Wrexham General Wrecsam Cyffredinol

Click here to download the current Cardiff Central Shrewsbury Birmingham Telford London Euston Crewe Manchester Warrington to Chester Flint Prestatyn Rhyl Abergele Colwyn bay Llandudno Junction Llandudno Bangor and Holyhead train timetable in pdf format

London Euston Milton Keynes Central
Crewe 
Chester 
Wrexham General Flint Prestatyn Rhyl 
Colwyn Bay 
Llandudno Junction 
Llandudno  Bangor Gwyned
Holyhead train timetable times virgin train trains Irish Mail

Click here to download the current London Euston Milton Keynes Crewe Chester Flint Prestatyn Rhyl Colwyn Bay Llandudno Junction Bangor Holyhead train timetable in pdf format

Please note download was correct on the date shown on timetable if in doubt visit
Traveline
An explanation of pdf files Allow me to explain

The Chester to Holyhead railway line is 85 miles long and is really part of the main line from London to Dublin via the ferries from Holyhead whilst it also serves the holiday resorts and industry along its route. Whilst it has lost much of its importance in all three areas thanks to cheap airfares overseas holidays and road transport (the Irish Mail has long since departed the summer holiday trains no longer run) it is still in use for the same purposes holiday makers still use the trains and some Virgin Voygers from London Euston and trains from elsewhere still connect with the Sea Cat and Swift to Ireland. Evidence of its much grander past can be seen all the way along its route the wide trackbed for some of the route and in places the miles of disused overgrown track running alongside the main line still in place on most parts of the railway network this would have been removed. The dissued sidings the large stations and many signal boxes many of which are still in use. This line really leaves you with an impression of how mainline railways used to be. No other railway line in Britain I have used do this.

For a brief history of the North Wales Coast line visit
John Speller's web page

Also see my
train ride fro Chester to Liverpool
and my
train ride from Manchester to Chester

Chester Railway Station

Looking east at Chester railway station


Awaiting Departure from Chester on an Arriva Wales Train bound for Holyhead

Awaiting departure from Chester for Holyhead, we are on board an Arriva Trains Wales service that started in Cardiff Central


Passing the line to Liverpool and Chesters Railway Sheds

As we leave Chester we pass the line to Liverpool and Chester's Railway Sheds


Leaving Chester on the railway for North Wales

As ee leave Chester we pass through a deep cutting which we are just coming to the end of in this shot note the unusual red rock


Passing Chester Racecourse

Just after the cutting Chester Racecourse appears on the left hand side of the train


Crossing the river Dee in Chester

We then cross the river Dee from this shot it is obvious this bridge once carried many more lines than it does today


Heading away from Chester towards Shotton on the train

The landscape opens up as we head away from Chester note the diussed overgrown track in this shot this stretch runs like this for quite some distance


Broughton Airbus Factory

We pass the Airbus Factory at Broughton. Broughton produce wings for various Airbus aircraft


Speeding through Shotton

We speed through Shotton


Flintshire Bridge from the train

The Flintshire Bridge carrying the A548 across the River Dee comes into sight


Connah's Quay Power Station

Passing Connah's Quay Power Station


Looking across the Dee estuary to the Wirral from the North Wales Coast Railway

The Dee Estuary widens and comes into sight. We are looking across at Merseyside the Wirral on the opposite side of the Dee, of course we are in Wales and we are looking at England


Flint railway station

We then call at Flint


Pulling away from Flint

Pulling away from Flint


Wide trackbed by the Dee Estuary

After Flint, this shot gives some idea of how wide the trackbed is at this point


The Dee Estuary

We are still running alongside the Dee Estuary and again the Wirral can be seen on the opposite bank


Passing the site of the old Holywell Station known as Holywell Junction

Passing the site off dissused Holywell Junction Station


The Duke of Lancaster Holywell

After Holywell a strange sight a derilict ship the Duke of Lancaster a former Sealink Ferry abandoned in a field at the side of the Dee. The ship was built in Belfast by Harland and Wolff and operated between Heysham and Belfast between 1955 and 1975, and Holyhead and Dun laoghaire between 1975 and 1979 and so forms part of what we will see later. In 1979 She was beached here at Llanerch-y-Mor with the intention of turning her into a leisure and retail complex called the fun ship but it never achieved its full potential for various reasons. In 1980 and 1981 I remember seeing it coulourfully lit up in the evenings so at that point was being used for some lesuire purpose but in realality has laid in this position for 34 years (this shot was taken in 2013) disused and rotting. Sad in some ways but maybe this has saved her from the breakers yard and she can still be seen. To me its a sight to be enjoyed


Duke of Lancaster Llanerch-y-Mor

Another view of the Duke of Lancaster. Any passengers making thier way to Holyhead to connect with the Sea Cat or Swift to Ireland bear in mind in years gone by this or similar ship would have taken them across the Irish Sea


North Wales Coast Railway

Continuing towards Mostyn Quay that can just be seen in this shot


Passing Mostyn Quay

We speed past Mostyn Quay note the overgrown track


The Dee Estuary

After Mostyn Quay the Dee estuary and the railway run alongside each other. Note the overgrown tracks that will have their own story to tell


Looking to the mouth of the Dee

We run along the side of the Dee Estuary towards the point of Ayr we are almost at its mouth and the open sea here


Passing the Point of Ayr

Heading round the point of Ayr at the mouth of the Dee. The chimneys of the gas sweetening plant can be seen in this shot. This is built on the site of the former Point of Ayr colliery


Talacre Signal Box

We then pass Talacre signal box


Talacre Station dissused

Passing through the now dissused Talacre station


Passing Haven caravan site Preshaven Sands

After Talacre we run into the holiday area as we pass Haven's Preshaven Sands caravan park


Caravan next to a railway

In places it almost feels like you are on the caravan site yourself


Passing Prestatyn Golf Course

We then pass Prestatyn Golf Course


Hills near Prestatyn

On the left hand side of the train there is some pleasant scenery as we approach Prestatyn


Approaching Prestatyn

Approaching Prestatyn


Prestatyn Railway Station

We then arrive at Prestatyn


Residential properties between Prestatyn and Rhyl

We the pass a long line of Residential properties between Prestatyn and Rhyl


Caravans between Prestatyn and Rhyl

And yet more caravans


Passing signal box No 1 Rhyl

As we enter Rhyl station we pass signal box no 1 still in use (2013)


Rhyl Station

We pull up at Rhyl station. Rhyl is a large holiday resort a sort of Welsh version of Blackpool.


As we await departure a London Euston bound Virgin Voyger arrives on the opposite platform

As we await departure a London Euston bound Virgin Voyger arrives on the opposite platform


Rhyl Number 2 signal box

We pass Rhyl number 2 box now dissused as we pull out of Rhyl


Pulling away from Rhyl on a train

Pulling away from Rhyl


Marine Lake Rhyl

We pass Marine Lake


River Cwyd Estuary Rhyl

We then cross the River Clwyd as we head towards Abergele and Pensarn


Caravans between Rhyl and Abergele and Pensarn

We pass more caravans as we head towards Abergele and Pensarn


Fun fair near Abergele

The holiday theme continues as we pass a fun fair sandwiched between the railway and the sea


Approaching Abergele hills in the background

On the left hand side of the train yet more caravans as we approach Abergele and Pensarn


Abergele and Pensarn

We then pass through Abergele amd Pensarn station


Abergele north wales

The width of the trackbed through the station and the arches on the bridge show how important this railway once was


Heading away from Abergele towards Colwyn Bay

Heading away from Abergele and Pensarn. Although we cant see it at this point on the left hand side of the train the main A55 road has appeared. This will now be periodically be with us right to Holyhead. This is a modern high speed dual carrigeway with some quite impressive features such as the Conway tunnel under the Conway estuary. This road links the motorway network at Chester with North Wales and Holyhead. This road has been built as the main road to Ireland and emphasizes the importance as the port of Holyhead. Although changed and not as important to foot passengers using train and boat Holyhead has now become the most important port to Ireland for road transport and the money invested in building A55 with some msjor engineering works as we shall see later proves this. And of course just like the railway used to it carries large amounts of holiday traffic to the North Wales Coast


Caravans between Abergele and Colwyn

Yet more caravans sandwiched between the sea and the railway however this is more or less the end of the caravan sites


Last of the Caravans

As we start to climb we get nearer to the sea and the caravans dwindle down to one row before vanishing altogether


North Wales Coast

We then get some good views of the sea if you look out to see you can see a wind farm in Liverpool Bay they are in this shot but barely visible, If you look to the left hand side of this picture you can also see the Great Orme at Llandudno in the murk


A55 between Abergele and Colwyn Bay

The A55 has crossed on to our right hand side as we run round the Penmaenhead headland and then crosses back to our left as we approacb Colwyn Bay. In this shot the road is passing under us as we look back


Looking along the A55 towards Colwyn Bay

Then in this shot looking on the left hand side of the train off the same bridge as the A55 heads towards Colwyn Bay


A55 heading into Colwyn Bay

View from the left hand side of the train the A55 heading into Colwyn Bay and much controversy when this section was constructed in 1985. The A55 as it runs through Colwyn Bay cuts the town off from the sea front and at the time of construction there was much opposition however the road was built it was obviously decided there should be no bottleneck in Colwyn Bay as the old A55 through the town centre would never cope with the volume of traffic. While the powers at B made this decision the legacy for the town must have been imense suddenly a popular seaside town had what amounts to a motorway running bang slap through the middle of it. This must have affected its popularity amongst holidaymakers in one foul swoop and wrecked an important part of the towns economy just imagine them doing the same thing in Blackpool or Scarborough. However the road right or wrong was built there is no doubt it is ugly and has changed the face of Colwyn bay forever and still causes controversy to this day in 2013 28 years after it was opened. It also shows how important this road is considered to be and why the railway these pictures are taken from was and still is so important. Me personally I think they should have invested much more money and tunneled under the town avoiding it completly (as we shall see later they have managed to do this in conwy or is it me just been unrealistic?) they would have got thier road Colwyn bay would have been intact benefiting from a much improved way of holidamakers getting there by road.


Colwyn Bay Sea front from the train

View from the right hand side of the train as we approach Colwyn Bay a sea front any town would be proud of


Colwyn Bay Station or as the station nameboard also shows it Bae Colwyn its true Welsh name. The signs in Wales shown in both Welsh and English

Arrived at Colwyn Bay Station or as the station nameboard also shows it Bae Colwyn its true Welsh name. The signs in Wales are often shown in both Welsh and English, The railway timetables are written in both Welsh and English, the deeper you travel into Wales the more you will hear the Welsh language spoken paticulary in the more remote parts. I have nothing but respect for a people proud of thier culture and language. Being a Yorkshireman I understand thier sentiments entirely. Must admit though cant imagine a Sheffield to Leeds via Barnsley timetable been written using a Barnsley accent but the thought's amusing


A55 running through the centre of Colwyn Bay

A view of the A55 from the left hand side of the train as we leave Colwyn Bay station this will give some idea of why this strech of road is so controversial


On a train between Colwyn Bay and Llandudno Junction

As we leave Colwyn bay the landscape greens up


On a train making our way round the back of Llandudno

The strech of track between Colwyn Bay and Llandudno Junction that we are on now really makes its way round the back of the Headland that the seaside resort of Llandudno sits on in this shot on the left hand side of the picture the mountains of Snowdonia also come into view as we draw closer to Llandudno Junction


Approaching Llandudno Junction

Approaching Llandudno Junction


Arrived at Llandudno Junction Station or Cyffordd Llandudno

Arrived at Llandudno Junction Station or Cyffordd Llandudno to give it its correct Welsh name. This is probably the most important intermediate station between Chester and Holyhead. It is where the short but very important branch line leaves the main line to head into what is arguably Wales most famous resort the splendid town of Llandudno. In the days of the holiday trains Llandudno would have been the final destination of most of them. Even today Llandudno is generaly well served with many of the through trains along the North Wales Coast from Manchester terminating there and I might add these trains are well used. Also it is the junction for the Conwy Valley Line to Betws-y-Coed and Blaenau Ffestiniog. Then by using the Festiniog narrow guage railway to Minffordd and Porthmadog you can connect into the Mid Wales Railway giving you access to towns such as Pwllheli, Barmouth, Aberystwyth, Machynlleth and Shrewsbury. The trains from Llandudno Junction to Blaenau Festiniog and vice versa do often connect with the Festiniog railway. This should give some idea of the importance of this station.

For more information on the Llandudno branch see my
train ride from Llandudno Junction to Llandudno


Pulling away from Llandudno Junction

Pulling away from Llandudno Junction


Got a business along any route of lunatictravel.com want a mention and a link click here for more info
The Llandudno Branch railway leaving Llandudno Junction

As we pull away from Llandudno Junction the Llandudno branch heads off to the right. This is where we lose much of the holiday feel of the line as we head for the capital of North Wales Bangor



A55 at start of th Conwy Tunnel Llandudno Junction

Just after Llandudno Junction we make our crossing of the Conwy Estuary. The roads we can see in this shot are the old A55 that is running parnell to us and the new A55 that is running under us and heading into the Conwy Tunnel, The old A55 crosses the Conwy Estuary on a bridge and straight into the Narrow streets of Conwy's one way system. Before the tunnel was built this was a massive bottleneck on the A55. Then in 1991 the Conwy tunnel was built the bottleneck vanished The beautiful town of Conwy was left virtually untouched. The amount of money invested must have been imense my question is why could they not have done something on that scale for Colwyn bay


Looking towards the mouth of the Conwy Estuary and Deganwy

Looking down towards the mouth of the Conwy Estuary, Deganwy stands on the right hand bank


View of Conwy

We are about to cross the Conwy Estuary in this shot. The famous Conwy Castle can be seen in this shot also although very hard to see in the right side of this shot the top of the original suspension bridge across the Conwy built by Thomas Telford in 1826 can just be seen. This is sandwiched between the railway bridge and the bridge built in 1958 to take the pressure of Telfords bridge. This bridge then carried all the traffic.on the A55 until the tunnel opened in 1991


Looking up the Conwy Valley

Looking up the Conwy valley from the left hand side of the train


Running round the back of Conwy Castle

Running around the back of Conwy Castle


Passing through Conwy station

Passing through Conwy station


Heading away from Conwy

Heading away from Conwy the Great Orme on the opposite side of the Conwy Estuary can be seen in the background


The mountains near Conwy

On the left hand side of the train the mountains start to come close to the railway just after Conwy. In this shot we can also see a lampost on the A55


A55 heading towards Penmaenmawr

At times the A55 runs right next to us


On the right hand side of the train we are right up against the sea

On the right hand side of the train we are right up against the sea as we run against the beach and through Penmenbach headland using a small tunnel the A55 dives through the headland in the Penmenbach tunnel which was originaly one tunnel built in 1932 then in 1989 a second tunnel was built to make the A55 at this point a dual carrigeway yet more evidence of the massve importance placed on this road


Heading towards Penmaenmawr we can see the Pen-y-Clip headland in front of us in this shot

B Heading towards Penmaenmawr we can see the Pen-y-Clip headland in front of us in this shot


Looking back at the Great Orme Llandudno

Looking back at Llandudno's Great Orme

To see more on the Great Orme see my
Cable car ride up the Great Orme Llandudno
and my
Tram ride up the Great Orme


Pen-y-Clip headland from the train

We draw closer to Penmaenmawr and the Pen-y-Clip headland


A55 heading towards Penmaenmawr

On the left hand side of the train the A55 heading towards Penmaenmawr


Penmaenmawr station

Speeding through Penmaenmawr


Great Orme from Pen-y-Clip.Headland

Looking back at the Great Orme from Penmaenmawr. Note the sidings here signs of past industry. The A55 has now crossed us and is sandwiched between the sea and the railway


A55 heading for the Pen-y-Clip tunnels

As we head out of to make our way round the Pen-y-Clip headland the A55 above makes its way to the Pen-y-Clip tunnels through the headland. the first tunnel which actualy was two tunnels were built in 1935 and the 2nd tunnel turning the road into a dual carrigeway was built in 1993 again more massive investment in this road. The railway passes through an Avalanche Shelter


Traveling round the Pen-y-Clip.Headland on a train

Making our way round the Pen-y-Clip Headland


Great on from a train passing round the Pen-y-Clip headland

Looking back at the Great Orme as we pass round the Pen-y-Clip Headland


Puffin Island and Anglesey from a train

From here we get a good view of Puffin Island we can also see the tip of the Isle of Anglesey


Approaching llanfairfechan

We then approach llanfairfechan we can see the seafront in this shot


Passing llanfairfechan sea front

A better view of llanfairfechan sea front as we speed by


llanfairfechan station

Speeding through llanfairfechan Station


Puffin Island and the Menai Strait

Looking back at Puffin Island as we leave llanfairfechan Amglesey can also be seen across the Menai Strait


hills near llanfairfechan

On the left hand side of thrain the scenery is worth a look


Anglesey as we head towards Bangor

Looking across the Menai Straitto Anglesey as we head towards Bangor


Snowdonia from the North Wales coast line

There are some superb views to Snowdonia from the left hand side of the train. The spectacular waterfall Aber Falls lies in the hills we can see in this shot


Crossing a viaduct near Bangor

View as we approach Bangor


Crossing a foot crossing just outside Bangor

Crossing a footpath just outside Bangor


Train leaving Bangor for Manchester Piccadilly

As we pull into Bangor station an Arriva Trains Walws train is leaving on the start of its journey to Manchester Piccadilly. This is the same type of train as we are on.
To see one of these trains in Manchester see my
train ride from Sheffield to Manchester stopping style


Arrived at Bangor Gwynedd

Arrived at Bangor


Bangor Signal Box

As we pull out of Bangor signal box this is unusual as it is built into hillside


Heading out of Bangor towards our crossing of the Menai Strait

Making our way from Bangor towards the Britannia Bridge where we will cross the Menai Strait onto the Isle of Anglesey. The trees and houses we can see in distance are on the isle of Anglesey


About to cross the Britannia Bridge over the Menai Strait

Making our way onto the Britannia Bridge note the lion guarding the bridge that can be just seen in this shot. This is a double deck bridge, we are on the lower deck the top deck carries the the A55 and the A5. The A5 starts at Marble Arch in London and joins the A55 at Bangor before making its way to Holyhead and its finish across Anglesey separately to the A55


Crossing the Menai Strait on the Britannia Bridge Telfords Suspension Bridge can be seen

Crossing the Menai Strait on the Britannia Bridge. In this shot Thomas Telfords Suspension Bridge can be seen in this shot. Work started on this bridge in 1819 and was completed in 1826 carried the London to Holyhead Road and for its day was a massive feat of engineering and shows how important Holyhead was as a port even in those days


View of the Menai Strait from the left hand side of the train as we cross the Britannia Bridge

View of the Menai Strait from the left hand side of the train as we cross the Britannia Bridge


Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch station

Arrived at Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch or Llanfairpwll as it is shown in the timetable. This is the longest place name in Britain and a bit of a tourist attraction. Please note the stations on Anglesey are request stops please ensure the guard knows if you want to alight at amy of them or if you wish to board give a clear signal to the driver this also applies to some of the other stations along the coast see timetable for more details


Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch station namebord

Certainly is a long station nameboard


Snowdonia from Anglesey on a train

On the left hand side of the train at this point we get a good view of the mountains of Snowdonia on the opposite side of the Menai Strait


Heading away from Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch

As we head away from Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobwllllantysiliogogogoch it soon becomes obvious we are somewhere unique the style and isolation of many of the buildings start to give this away it has to be remembered we are now on an island


Anglesey opening up

The landscape of Anglesey opening up


Heading towards Bodorgan

Heading towards Bodorgan


Crossing the Afon Cefni

Crossing the Afon Cefni


Arrived at Bodorgan station

Arrived at Bodorgan the Arriva wales signs say


Bodorcan station

Or Bodorcan as this sign says


Llyn Coron from a train

As we leave Bodorgan Llyn Coron comes into view on the left hand side of the train


On a train between Bodorgan an Ty-Croes

Between Bodorgan and Ty-Croes


Ty-Croes Station

Arrived at Ty-Croes


Windmill turned into a house Ty-Croes

A windmill now used as a house can be seen as we leave Ty-Croes there is a second one of these just after this one


On a train between Ty-Croes and Rhosneigr

Between Ty-Croes and Rhosneigr


Rhosneigr station

Arrived at Rhosneigr


Looking across at Rhosneigr

Looking across at the villiage of Rhosneigr as we pull away from the station


Heading away from Rhosneigr

Heading away from Rhosneigr next stop Valley


A house from a train Anglesey

An unusual sight a isolated house between Rhosneigr and Valley


RAF Valley

Just after this RAF Valley comes into view


Royal Air Force base Valley Anglesey

The Air Force Base is massive and we seem to run along side it for quite some time
For more information visit the RAF Valley website


Between Rhosneigr and Valley

As we head towards Valley it really feels like we are running off the end of the world


We pass the The Wylfa Nuclear Power Station sidings just before we arrive at Valley

We pass the The Wylfa Nuclear Power Station sidings.just before we arrive at Valley


Level Crossing Valley Anglesey

Ee cross a level crossing just before Valley station


Valley Station

Arrived at Valley


Leaving Valley

Pulling out of Valley bound for Holyhead


Causeway between Anglesey and Holy Island

Shortly after Valley we cross the causeway between Anglesey and Holy Island. We can see the new causeway carrying the A55 in this shot, we are on the original causeway carrying the railway and the A5


We then pass Anglesey Aluminium Metal Ltd

We then pass Anglesey Aluminium Metal Ltd


Making our way across Holy Island towards Holyhead

Making our way across Holy Island towards Holyhead


Morrisons Holyhead

Suddenly a Morrisons appears


Water tower Holyhead

Dating back to steam days we pass a water tower on the approach to Holyhead


A55 approaching Holyhead

The A55 on the opposite side of the train is now approaching its final destination the port of Holyhead


Sidings outside Holyhead station

Passing sidings and Holyhead engine shed outside Holyhead Station. There was obviously much more here once


Holyhead signal box

Passing Holyhead signal box


Arriving at Holyhead

Pulling into Holyhead station


Arrived at Holyhead

Arrived at Holyhead Station. Holyhead in welsh is Coergybi


Holyhead platform 2

We alight onto platform 2


The end of the line Holyhead

The end of the line beyond the buffers is the modern ferry terminal and the way on to Dublin and Ireland, turn right just before the ferry terminal and there is a modern footbridge to the town centre

For information on ferry services to Ireland from Holyhead visit
Stena Line
and
Irish Ferries


The old Holyhead dock

To our left is the old now dissused quay where the ships used to dock names such as the St Columba and the Duke of Lancaster remember the fun ship earlier in the journey. This quay could not even be accesed by large vessels anymore as it is cut of by bridges serving the new terminal and the footbridge to the town that can be seen in this shot


Holyhead looking back in the Direction of Chester

Looking back in the Direction of Chester from platform 2


The old ferry terminal Holyhead

From where the shot was taken on platform 2 there is a door on the right hand side. Go through this door and we enter a strange world the old but modernised ferry terminal now semi derilict it is now just a walk through to platform 1. The shuttered door on the right in this shot is where passengers would have made thier way to the Ships


Platform 1 Holyhead

Platform 1


Interior of the old Holyhead ferry terminal

From the old terminal the view of the Ship would have been fantastic through these picture windows


The plauque commemorating the opening of the modernised Holyhead ferry terminal in 1991

The plauque commemorating the opening of the modernised Holyhead ferry terminal in 1991


clock tower Holyhead Station

A clock tower infront of the 1991 entrance to Holyhead ferry terminal and station commemorating the port of Holyhead extension in 1875


A view across the port of Holyhead

A view of the port of Holyhead from the old approach road. The 1991 footbridge to the town centre we can see on the right is now dissused


A view of the old Holyhead port building from the town

A view of platform 1 and the old Quayside buildings from the town


Entrance to the new Holyhead Ferry terminal

By contrast the entrance to the new Holyhead ferry terminal


Inside the new Ferry Terminal

The interior of the new ferry terminal


Check in desks Holyhead

The check in desks


Plaque commemorating the opening of the new ferry terminal in 1995. This means the old modernised terminal was only in use for 4 years

Plaque commemorating the opening of the new ferry terminal in 1995. This means the old modernised terminal was only in use for 4 years. With the introduction of much larger vessels the new terminal had to be built as they would not fit into the original Harbour


Inside a Virgin Voyager at Holyhead

In my younger days I remember seeing hoardes of people transfering from train to boat or boat to train in the days when three boat trains would leave for London having connected with the dinner time arrival of the boat from Ireland. Also when the Irish Mail left Holyhead in the early hours bound for London having connected with the evening sailing from Ireland indeed I traveled on the Irish Mail to London on a number of occasions. My memories of this were in the late 70's and early 80's in the days before cheap flights.
Well heres proof it still happens if on a much smaller scale. While I was collecting material I used a Virgin Voyger that had originated at London Euston. It was made up of 8 carriages. I did not realise how busy this train was when I boarded at Llandudno Junction. On arrival on platform 1 at Holyhead the aisle filled with people alighting making thier way to the ferrry. The shot above is the now empty interior of that very train on platform 1 at Holyhead


View of platform 1 Holyhead from a train

View of platform 1 from the train note the signs to the ship when these were put up it was reffering to the old terminal but are still right for the new terminal


Virgin Voyager platform 1 Holyhead

The train on platform 1 passengers making thier way to the ferry


International travelers London to Dublin

They then make thier way through the old terminal to platform 2 and the new terminal until 1995 they would have gone through the roller shuttered doors in the background to board the ship. Many of the people are international travelers making thier way between to of Europes capital cities


Holyhead Virgin Voyger

Looking back at the train from the old terminal


Awaiting departure for London Euston at Holyhead

A view of the Virgin Voyager on platform 1 at Holyhead awaiting departure for London Euston


Two ships at Holyhead awaiting departure for Ireland

A view of 2 ships awaiting departure for Ireland at Holyhead this shot was taken from the new footbridge to the town centre from the station


A view of the now cut off Quays Holyhead

A view of the old cut off Harbour and station from the new footbridge


Celtic Gateway Footbridge from Holyhead town centre to Holyhead Ferry Terminal

View from the new footbridge to Holyhead ferry terminal


Celtic Gateway Bridge Holyhead

The start of the new footbridge from Holyhead town centre to the ferry terminal the bridge is called the Celtic Gateway bridge and was built in 2006 this gives far better access to the station and terminal than anything before


Market Street Holyhead

The Bridge brings you out on Market St that is where we are now


St Cybi's Church Holyhead

An interesting building near Market Street St Cybi's Church


Stanley St Holyhead

As we walk towards Newry Beach we pass along Stanley St


Newry St Holyhead

We then walk along Newry St this place has quite a feel to it


Palm tree Newry Street

Further along Newry St note the palm tree in this shot


Newry-Fawr Holyhead

Newry St turns into Newry-Fawr as we approach Newry Beach


Newry Beach Holyhead

Then we arrive at Newry Beach


Beach Rd Holyhead

Looking down Beach Rd note the sea mist on the hills. It has to be remembered that we are now on a small island Holy Island at the tip of the Isle of Anglesey which means we are totally surrounded by the Irish Sea


Looking out to sea through the mouth of Holyhead Harbour

Looking out to sea from Newry Beach through the mouth of Holyhead Harbour from here its Ireland next stop





Fool


Return to the last bus stop








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